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Dream Foundation maintains a network of people that are happy to give you first-hand and practical advice. You can get in touch with them through Dream Network .

You have to take every opportunity!

Liis Madik

Aarhus Business College (Aarhus, Denmark), Marketing Management

Cambridge, England

Studies abroad – a difficult challenge or a wonderful experience?

Karin Kalda

Aarhus Business College
Marketing Management

How can studying abroad help you enlarge your personal network?

Erki Lipre

Aarhus Business College, Marketing Economist

Ashcroft International Business School of Anglia Ruskin University, International Management

Work for your goals

Pärtel-Erik Rõuk

University of Glasgow

From hesitation to the right decisions

Polina Butsenko

University College Birmingham

Practical Experience

Heigo Salimaa

TEKO – International Sales and Marketing (graduated in 2008)

Experience & Studying

Kristi Juhandi

Bachelor of Arts (Hons), International Management, Ashcroft International Business School, Cambridge, UK

AP Marketing Economist, Aarhus Business College, Aarhus, Denmark

Independence

Kärt Luik

TEKO – International Sales

Where there is a will, there is a way

Katarina Tuulik

Studied in Switzerland

Only One Step from a Dream to Reality

Tarvi Randver

Aarhus Business College (Aarhus, Denmark), Marketing Management (AP)

Ashcroft International Business School (Cambridge, UK), International Management (BA)

Life and times abroad

Ivan Dragoev

Bulgarian Student in Denmark

You have to take every opportunity!

Liis Madik

My name is Liis, I am 21 years old and I have graduated from Marketing Management in Aarhus Business College in Denmark. For a year after my studies I worked in an advertising agency, and in January this year I will continue my studies in Cambridge, England.

Sometimes it happens that good things and opportunities come to you without you doing much about it, especially in moments when you least expect them. That's what happened to me.

Three years ago I was certain that I knew exactly what I would be doing after finishing secondary school, so I did not pay much attention to all the hassle connected with choosing a high school and a specialty. Despite that, I decided also to apply for studies in a foreign country and in a field that was totally different from my initial choice. Something in me told me already back then that I should grab every opportunity. I did not pay attention to people saying that there are too many applicants and my chances are unreal. However, I was right because already four months later I got off the train in Aarhus train station and told myself that it was time to grow up.

During the two years in Denmark I learned and developed a lot. The biggest asset from my studies abroad is not the excellent education nor interesting places I saw and visited, it's people. The fact that you know right people in right places is the key to success.

I also noticed abroad that the world does not seem so big all of a sudden, and I so small and insignificant. It was quite to the contrary – I seemed to have so many choices, it was just the question of taking them and seeing what happens. I believe that the bigger the window to the world gets, the more and further you wish to see. But how can you make good decisions if you are not even aware of the opportunities?

Now that I have used the acquired knowledge in Estonia for a year, I have decided to improve myself even further. I am about to start a new life and studies in England. But this time, unlike my decision in Aarhus train station, I am convinced that actually I do not wish to grow up. I hope that I will never lose the guts to dive into the unknown, and the will to always expect more of myself. There are no mistakes to be made, only lessons to be learned, and hence you have nothing to fear.

Studies abroad – a difficult challenge or a wonderful experience?

Karin Kalda

Aarhus Business College
Marketing Management

As a liberal, I hold freedom – the freedom to choose, the freedom to decide, the freedom to be myself and just to exist – as one of the greatest values. To live just as colourful a life that in the old age I would have something to remember and miss.

Last summer, when I started to analyse my accomplishments thus far, I found myself impatiently walking in circles. How curious. Previously, I had worked in sales and participated in several election campaigns, my job as the press consultant for the Estonian Parliament was really exciting. My schoolyears had been varied – I had acquired knowledge both in real and social sciences and held a fresh diploma in the field of economic law. Everything seemed to be great and I would have thought I was mature enough, but still I yearned for something new, something even more exciting.

I kept asking myself what it was that I really wanted, what did I consider important and how should I proceed. I figured out I was impatient for a change of environment, my English skills could be improved, my knowledge of economy was rather one-sided and superficial, and my curiosity about what was going on in the world was much greater than I could have thought. I felt that I did not stand out among others in the labour market, I wanted to have more advantages and that my weaknesses would become my strengths.

My studies in Denmark, in the field of marketing, turned out to be the best thing to quench my thirst. At the same time, I could call it a wonderful course in self-discovery – everything that had seemed obvious and unambiguous had to be questioned and re-examined, because the environment had changed and the circumstances were new.

My ability to adapt was improved, my horizons widened and new principles established. I even learned to enjoy the situation of having to wait, soaked through in a typical Danish rain shower, for the train that was 20 minutes delayed, because I did not have a bike and the bus just decided not to come. It wasn't even that difficult, as people around me were happy and content despite all that, nobody worried too much about the train being late. Life can actually be really beautiful and a lot simpler than it seems at first. Happiness is inside everything and everyone.

After moving abroad my internal monologue improved, and I found out that my strength really wasn't openness and tolerance towards others, as I had thought. I had to learn a lot to understand other people better. In Denmark, you meet people from many different nationalities every day, and as a typical Estonian I had quite a few preconceptions about them. Were they reasonable? No. Did I want to maintain them? No. Was it possible to try to understand and value the differences? Yes.

Studying together with young people from ten different nationalities I realised the uniqueness of my own homeland and culture, reasons for the Estonians' behaviour, and was able to better separate the important from the unimportant. I became culturally more mature, open and aware. I am convinced that if I started to work today, I would be able to use the Estonians' strengths in a way that would benefit us to the greatest extent both economically and culturally.

I also learned to be braver and to do things I used to be afraid of, but having tried, felt really victorious. For instance, I used to be scared of presenting and debating in front of big audiences, especially in a foreign language. After several attempts to overcome this fear my self-confidence grew and my naturally obstinate character became mellower. Today, I feel myself quite at home during negotiations with international competitors over a new market share.

Life is an adventure and a sort of fight for the better, in which something unexpected may jump out at you from behind every corner. To be ready for all the surprises, to mature, to stand out in the labour market, to experience more than just the mundane – all this comes with studying abroad. I wish you courage, honesty about yourself, and interest in the world affairs, so that in the future you would have something colourful to remember and be proud of.

How can studying abroad help you enlarge your personal network?

Erki Lipre

In 2005 I moved to Aarhus, Denmark, and started studying in Aarhus Business College's two-year Marketing Economist programme. In the end, I was awarded an AP degree in Marketing Economy with special honors, and an award by Sydbankas Fondes. In 2007, I moved to Cambridge, United Kingdom, and started studying in Ashcroft International Business School of Anglia Ruskin University. After a year, I was granted BA(Hons) in International Management, First Degree.

When I was asked to write a short article about the pros and cons of studying abroad I was rather sceptical. I thought I was asked for just another success story (read: sales pitch) about why to go to study abroad. Nevertheless, the more I thought about my own experience the more I realised that I would really like to write this article and hopefully inspire somebody to broaden their mindset and inspire them to take steps toward achieving their goals.

I will focus on one of the most important benefits of studying abroad, i.e. people. When you study abroad you will meet people whom you never would have met otherwise. You make new friends and definitely new acquaintances who will enhance your personal network for all your future engagements. Have you noticed how easy it is to stay in contact with your friends or acquaintances these days? Social networking sites, e-mail, cheap phone calls, Skype – all of these means have broadened our personal interaction space and intensified rapidly ongoing globalization.

While you study abroad, you not only meet people from the country you are located in, but from other countries as well. Communicating with people from different countries enhances your cultural knowledge as well as your cross-cultural communication skills. You will learn about their homeland and their values, which is enlightening and helps you to appreciate your own culture.

Going abroad often shows you who are your true friends – the ones that will always be there for you, even if you are far-far away. It gives you an opportunity to allocate your time and energy to the ones that are worth it.

During my 3 years abroad I met some fantastic people – top-level businessmen and high-end MBA’s, even such a leading expert as Dr. Meredith Belbin, whose renowned theory is studied in universities across the world. Dr. Belbin has defined team roles and characteristics of people who interact or work in a team, and happens to be one of the most famous theorist as well as a consultant who analyzes people's characteristics and how these interact in broader sense. Would I actually have had an opportunity to have lunch with him otherwise? Maybe. There is no way of knowing, however I most certainly would not have met all those brilliant and wonderful people I came in contact with.

I perceive my personal network as one of the most important resources I have. Of course, I do not use my friends and acquaintance for my personal gain. I live by the knowledge and I believe that each party in a relationship has to bring some value to it; only this way you can create a win-win situation – the only kind of a relationship that holds in the long-run. To me, networking is important and I always try to remember Keith Ferrazzi’s suggestion “never eat alone”.

I truly think that my time abroad was valuable, that it taught me a lot and gave me one of the best start-up platforms for future.

Work for your goals

Pärtel-Erik Rõuk

University of Glasgow

At the beginning of the final year in high school I started the process of applying to universities in the UK. In addition to writing a personal letter, one has to include a recommendation letter from a teacher, exam results and other personal background information in the application.

After finishing high school, I was accepted into Law at a university in the UK, but I switched Law for History, Politics and French – a decision some might consider unwise but I maintain that it's far more important to study something you are interested in and feel comfortable with, rather than to rush into something that has in essence remained ambiguous. I changed the courses because I felt it was not the ideal subject to pursue for me and my future ambitions. Although universities usually allow students to change their field of study, it goes without saying that it is better to know what you want to study from early on.

At the time of writing this, I have finished my first semester and got the first taste of exams. I enjoy my lectures and tutorials. Although you may initially be scared of the concept of studying abroad in a foreign language, it is nothing to be overly distressed about because in the appropriate environment, languages are easily picked up.

I share a room with a British guy in one of the university's dorms only a fifteen-minute walk's distance from the campus. There are a few different options available for accommodation provided by the university, such as catered and self-catered shared and single rooms, shared and single rooms in student apartments, and the university also has a service to aid students find private accommodation. It can be quite a gamble to get a shared room, because you can never know who you might end up with and if you'd be able to get on with the other person at all, but I was lucky with my roommate. In my accommodation, there is a single laundry room with two washing machines and two dryers and multiple showers and kitchens per one floor. The kitchens are not only used for cooking but also for socialising. Furthermore, as it is often cheaper to cook food by yourself than to eat out, cooking is one of the essential skills for a student.

Overall, I am at the moment highly satisfied with my course, the university, the accommodation and my life in general. So far, I am truly happy of having chosen to study in the UK and I can't wait to get back.

If you want to study abroad you need to:

  • be persistent about achieving your goal;
  • work for it – good things don't just happen by themselves;
  • make decisions early on and do as much research beforehand as possible;
  • have the confidence of leaving the comfort zone of your home environment;
  • not be afraid of asking others for help and of communicating.

Whoever you are, if you are reading this, good luck!

From hesitation to the right decisions

Polina Butsenko

University College Birmingham

I did not think for long what would happen to me after finishing secondary school. Meaning, I was pretty clear about it. I had a definite plan to go to study abroad. My future home country was picked out rather easily as well. When I graduated, I knew two foreign languages - Russian and English – both on a required level. As I could not find a suitable school in Russia, the decision was in favour of good old England.

I learned about different universities and the programmes they offer. The most difficult, but at the same time the most important part of the application process was filling in all the documentation. Finding out what lies ahead and how much work it takes to get a place abroad I almost gave up at first. However, two weeks before the application deadline in English universities I pulled myself together, passed the English test, gathered all the documents and mailed them off to the school. It turned out to be much less nerve-racking as I had thought in the beginning.

At the end of June I sent in my exam results and secondary school diploma, and by the end of August I found out I had been accepted. So you should not think that everyone studying abroad is perfect. We are also just people with ordinary backgrounds.

I decided to go to study abroad because I yearned for something new, different, even extreme to a certain extent, which I couldn't really say about my former life. I wanted to give it a try and I was also very curious. Was I scared? Of course I was; I worried, changed my mind a hundred times, could not get depressing thoughts out of my head. But the best treatment for me was work, I had a full-time job for the whole summer, so I could keep my thoughts occupied with it.

By now, I have lived abroad for five months and I am satisfied with my life. A big benefit of England is the fact that I can get cheap plane tickets to most destinations of the world – for someone who likes to travel as much as I do, it's a great bonus. During my time here I have been to all the bigger local cities, such as Liverpool, Manchester, Bristol, Cambridge and London repeatedly.

One of the more memorable moments was the November 11 military parade in London, in honour of the end of the World War I. I felt rather proud to be singing the anthem of Great Britain along with all the Brits and the Queen. Even though I'm a patriot of my home country, I felt at that moment that I had picked the right place for my studies. The population of Great Britain is almost 34 times bigger than in my homeland, and includes many nationalities. My friends come from 15 different countries. This thought alone is enough to make me smile and feel good. In addition, since I live in a dorm, we usually cook dinners together. It is very exciting to get to know new cultures while preparing different dishes, and to find out that what we consider quite common and mundane is totally unacceptable for another culture.

The time as a student also contains plenty of problems: often there is not enough money or you worry about homework. But that's just part of the life as a student, the life I was looking forward to so impatiently during secondary school. Believe in yourself, act and think only afterwards, love your close ones, surround yourself with a circle of friends who will support you, and use every opportunity you get, because there might not be another one.

Practical Experience

Heigo Salimaa

TEKO – International Sales and Marketing (graduated in 2008)

When you go to study abroad, it is important to be open, willing to communicate, and not fear to ask for help and advice from other people. Ability to make contacts and enter into new relations comes in handy in finding a job as well as in adjusting yourself with your new life. Speaking the local language would not hurt either but, for instance, in Denmark knowledge of English is quite sufficient.

When looking for a job, you could use some will, enthusiasm and flexibility. Do not set yourself too high expectations or ambitions, as in that case you might more likely find yourself unemployed. I worked as a postman aside from my studies – the job was surprisingly fun and the salary was good; after paying my rent and other living expenses there was even some of it left. The only negative side of my job was being out in the rain, which I didn't exactly enjoy :). I should mention that in welfare states also simple jobs let you earn a proper salary and help you to make ends meet during the studies.

To describe the studies, I preferred the teaching methods in TEKO over the ones used in higher education institutions in my homeland. Instead of cramming and theoretical study, the learning was more practical – so-called problem-solving based learning. The aim was to be able to successfully apply the knowledge and skills taught to your everyday life. There were only two examinations in two years and mostly the emphasis was on different projects and other practical work to provide the students with a solid foundation for their future work. Although I studied international sales and marketing in connection with clothing industry, I also acquired knowledge in the fields of design, logistics, purchasing, production and quality management – in one word, I got acquainted with the whole industry, not only my specific field.

Participation in lectures and classes was never tiresome, because the material was interesting and teachers favoured active input. It seldom happened that you did not need to participate in the discussion about relevant topics, and my co-students were eager to find out more about the subjects. Our professors were experts in their field and often worked in a business related to the subject they taught. For example, our sales professor had been working for Lego for 25 years in different positions in marketing, sales and product development. Popular Lego dolls is one of the many ideas he developed. Another example is the long-term marketing and quality manager of ECCO, who taught us marketing and advertising.

By now, I am back at home and work in a field that is indirectly linked to the specialty I studied, namely advertising and media. To conclude, I would like to say that being brave does not earn you a bullet in the butt but a medal on your chest!

Experience & Studying

Kristi Juhandi

Bachelor of Arts (Hons), International Management, Ashcroft International Business School, Cambridge, UK

AP Marketing Economist, Aarhus Business College, Aarhus, Denmark

To study in another country is an extraordinary and fantastic opportunity as well as a great challenge. It does not only mean the acquisition of knowledge at the university, but also constant self-improvement, fast adjustment and many other things to help you manage in exciting and more or less complicated situations that you may come across in a new environment. And be assured – there's plenty of those!

When you continue your studies after secondary school in your homeland, the differences can be felt only in the changed organisation of studies, the rest is already familiar and customary. You know the system, your friends and family are close by and you are used to the surrounding environment.

Comfort and fear are the two main obstacles stopping us from meeting new exciting challenges. It is much easier to make choices when you know in principle what lies ahead and have to change your habits relatively little.

Going to study abroad means something totally different, and is usually accompanied with significant rearrangement of your life. This is all part of the process, and if you have a little bit of will and enthusiasm, most of the obstacles can be overcome, and they might even turn out to be not all that significant as compared to all the positive experience.

Studying abroad enhances your ability and skills to manage in difficult situations, based on the development of social skills. As most of your coursemates are new to you, you have to find your place among them and try to get to know them. It is quite common that your co-students come from different corners of the world, which means that they have a very different cultural and social background, making your experience more enriching. In seminars, for instance, where the study process relies on dialogue and discussion, you have an opportunity to hear other viewpoints and look at the world from someone else's shoes. At the same time, however, all the students have something in common – they are adventurous, open-minded, brave and believe in never-ending self-improvement.

The advantage of studying abroad does not lie only in the acquired knowledge base but also in the experience of managing on your own, in the ability to adjust to a new environment, and in social skills. This all tends to be left aside when your university studies consist of mostly hunting for theoretical knowledge from the books. All the positive things you get from your studies give you a competitive advantage and a solid foundation for great success in your future. Grab the bull by the horns!

Independence

Kärt Luik

TEKO – International Sales

The main benefit you get from studying abroad is independence. I feels great to know that you can manage on your own when necessary. This ability gives you more freedom as well as tolerance. After moving abroad you have to build up a totally new life: find new friends, get acquainted with your new hometown and with various possibilities it offers. Settling in in a new environment and making new contacts are challenges that you might find difficult to overcome, but you have to keep in mind that they are only a small part of studying abroad, and experiences like these help build your character and understand the world at large.

When I went abroad I knew that I had to find a job and learn to handle my finances myself. I did not have a choice, I had to manage on my own. I started to actively look for work straight away and found a job as a mail carrier for the local newspaper. Not all my co-students were as lucky in finding a job right away. You have to keep in mind that besides working you also have to have time for attending lectures and doing your homework, and the job should not interfere with that. My experience is that whoever really needs a part-time job can find one. Carrying mail was not always an easy job, but thanks to it I got to know many nice people and saw the town and local people from a different perspective.

Besides looking for a job I also had to find a place to live and take care of everyday chores from cooking to doing the laundry. When you have only begun with your independent life, this can be quite a challenge. You don't have experience nor anyone to give a helping hand – you're on your own. So it might happen that the first potatoes you fry end up a shade or two darker than intended, but from that on you can only do better. During my search for accommodation I visited many flats, met a lot of locals, came in contact with the local language and customs. In that respect, looking for a place to live can even turn out as an adventure.

All the trials you go through increase your independence, teach you a lesson and give you a wonderful experience to manage in complicated situations in the future. All this compiled is the advantage of studying abroad. Learning new customs, acquiring a comprehensive education and taking full resposibility for yourself make your time abroad quite extraordinary. On top of that, acquired skills would be valued highly by your future employers - it all affects your attitude towards life. You can be confident: you know you will manage!

Where there is a will, there is a way

Katarina Tuulik

Studied in Switzerland

I want to study abroad! That was the feeling I woke up with one morning. Like most of my ideas, this one also came out of the blue. To realise the thought I signed up for a study-abroad programme and told my parents about the idea. They laughed at me because they didn’t believe I could find the money to actually go and study abroad. The next day I started to look for sponsors who would pay for my studies. It was not an easy task because companies were not eager to cooperate. Slowly the idea became a dream. I understood what a chance living and studying in a foreign country could be. Day after day I looked for companies who would be interested in sponsoring me. During eight months I visited approximately 170 firms. The time was really stressful as I had to keep up with my homework and work out a lot. On the other hand, it was also interesting as I could test my willingness to fulfil my dream. Strong motivation led to success. After months of hard work I was able to find companies and individuals who were interested in supporting me.

I packed my bags, said goodbye to my parents and flew away. First emotions abroad were very positive. I was really satisfied with what I had accomplished – I had really fulfilled my dream of going to study abroad. But that was not where my ambitions stopped. I really wanted to make the most of it. My first priority was to learn another language. In order to do that I studied new vocabulary every morning while drinking my morning tea and wrote out phrases I didn’t know but had heard at school. After about 3 months I was already able to communicate in a new language.

During the studies I experienced another challenge - adapting to new cultures. In the beginning it was rather difficult to get used to the ways students from different countries lived but in the end I could accept all the different cultures. For many international students it was hard to manage their expenses while studying abroad. It could have also been a problem for me but I decided to find a part-time job and with the help of the extra money I did pretty well.

The experience of studying abroad has been the best one in my life so far. It opened up the world for me. I could study in a wonderful educational atmosphere and, in addition to that, I experienced many situations that have made me a stronger and more open-minded person. There were many obstacles on the way to get to study abroad and also during the studies, but with motivation and the will to succeed I overcame them all. Every person, regardless of their background and financial situation, has a chance to study abroad - if they want it. Where there is a will, there is a way.

Only One Step from a Dream to Reality

Tarvi Randver

School: Aarhus Business College (Aarhus, Denmark)
Specialty: Marketing Management (AP)

School: Ashcroft International Business School (Cambridge, UK)
Specialty: International Management (BA)

Everyone of us has their secret dreams. Some of them can be considered realistic, the others are not meant to be fulfilled – they are just too good to become true. But what if I told you that nothing is too good to become the reality?

I'm completely convinced that actually everything is possible. No, my family is not rich, I don't have supreme intelligence nor outstanding athletic achievements. But I believe that it is important to try, to improve yourself and always aspire to become better. Even if an obstacle seems too high to overcome at a first glance, you have to take it on, and you might surprise yourself by managing to do something that you considered impossible... All you have to do is to try your best.

Too often I have heard my friends and acquaintances speak about wanting to study abroad, to apply for a grant or an interesting job, only giving it up with the thought of „I won't anyway“. I have one message for all of them – you have to try, because you have nothing to lose!

I myself would not have believed some time ago that I could go to study abroad. I didn't have money and my grades weren't exactly great. I only had a modest dream and a will to try... Filling the application took about an hour of my time and the application fee was nothing much either. I went through the process with quite a lot of doubt and forgot all about it for a while. As a total surprise to myself, barely half a year later I found myself studying in Denmark on a specialty that I really liked and living the life of a student to the fullest. I had to take up a part-time job to cover my living expenses, but that was more fun than work, and on top of everything, with my part-time job I could afford more than some of my full-time employed friends back home. The folks I hung around with were great and I met some people who have become very important for me by now.

After having tasted this adventure, it suddenly seemed that everything was possible. And it was. Since I wanted different experience, I decided to do my internship in Stockholm, Sweden. This was something a small-town boy such as me couldn't have dreamt of in the past. And all of a sudden it was reality. From this period I remember fulfilling workdays, fantastic nights out and cooking with friends.

After six months in Stockholm I still hadn't calmed down, and thus decided to fly to the States, which turned out to be one of the most unforgettable periods in my life. I ended up living with a person who introduced me to a life in Hollywood, and during my time there I met quite a few celebs face to face.

At the moment I continue my studies in the English university town of Cambridge. I am looking forward to spring, to head out for the next extraordinary adventure, for which I have plenty of ideas. Sometimes, when I recall the places I've been to and the things I've done, I still find it all hard to believe.

My story should teach everyone that even though you might not come from a wealthy family or have loads of talent, everything is still possible. Dreaming is good, but it is even more important to look for and seize opportunities even if their realisation seems unlikely at first. You have nothing to lose!

Life and times abroad

Ivan Dragoev

Bulgarian Student in Denmark

Becoming independent is part of becoming more and more mature. In this connection, living abroad, away from your home country and your parents, is definitely helping to build a relevant base for maturity.

One of the first things in this regard is the way you are going to communicate with the people in the new country. If you don’t know the native language, you must refer to English. That’s probably going to be your only “connection” with the locals. А basic level of English is required, which you are going to use as a foundation to build your English skills on. And here comes the benefit – the more you speak, the better you become. That’s a valuable experience you don’t want to miss, simply because this is the best way of learning English. You know what they say – practice makes perfect. School lessons cannot even be compared to this way of acquiring English. Besides, language skill is something you can use everywhere since English is the most spoken language worldwide.

Another thing that comes to my mind when thinking about living abroad is all the new cultures and nationalities you are going to come in contact with. You will notice a big difference in the way people behave. Each nation has its own characteristics. Some of these you are going to like and others not. The point is that in any case you will become more broad-minded and your mental horizon expands towards the new and yet undiscovered. Reflecting upon your past, you will see a significant improvement in the present. That is another experience you don’t want to miss, because it will come in handy in your future relations with people.

Speaking of benefits, think about the main reason you went abroad for in the first place – the education. Education abroad is something very different from Bulgarian education system. A simple example of this is the fact that teachers here could often be considered as your friends. The way the whole educational system is organized is different. At first you might experience some difficulties but later on you will find out that you quite like it. That’s mainly because all the pressure I used to feel as a student in Bulgaria doesn’t exist here. School environment is calm and relaxed, but when it comes to work you've got to do what you've got to do. One useful aspect of your studies is the computer skills you are going to acquire. That’s something you can’t manage without nowadays. With time you develop your knowledge of all the basic important computer programs that you are going to use for a long time afterwards. That’s something you will benefit from in your future career no matter what kind it is.

As a conclusion, I might say that going to study abroad is really worth being away from your home country and parents. You put in effort into something that you are going to benefit from in future, no doubt about that.