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BScPsychology, Clinical and Cognitive Neuroscience

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Overview

Psychology is an important subject because it relates to the whole range of human experience, from visual perception to complex social interactions. It involves the study of how people think, react and interact, and is concerned with all aspects of behaviour and the thoughts, feelings and motivations that underlie such behaviour.

Our three year psychology, clinical & cognitive neuroscience degree examines the relationships between the brain and higher functions such as decision-making and consciousness, the causes, symptoms and treatments of common brain disorders such as stroke and Parkinson’s disease, and methods for studying the brain such as functional MRI.

You’ll study in one of the country’s top Psychology departments with excellent ratings for both research and teaching. The course explores a broad range of key areas within psychology specialising in the final year in the study of neuroscientific approaches to understanding cognition and clinical mental health issues.

Our research and teaching enhance one another, bringing students in touch with the frontiers of psychological knowledge. You’ll benefit from state of the-art equipment including an on-site MRI scanner for studying brain structure and activity, instruments for recording electrical changes in the brain (EEG), apparatus to stimulate focal areas in the brain (TMS) and a dedicated baby lab for studying the development of infants.

You’ll join a close-knit department with a high staff-to-student ratio, learning in small tutorial groups. The Department of Psychology has been awarded the Athena SWAN Silver Award for efforts to promote equality and women in science, and scores consistently high satisfaction rankings in the annual National Student Survey.

Programme structure

Year 1

Introduction to Psychological Research
This module will introduce you to the core aspects of psychological research including how to find, read and interpret psychological papers and how to think critically about research. You will cover general aspects of research, including ethical considerations, designs and variables, reliability and validity, and the design of both quantitative and qualitative studies. You will be introduced to different types of data and distributions, learning how to describe and analyse data using inferential statistics such as the chi-squared test, independent and repeated t-tests, one-way independent ANOVA, correlational analyses, linear regression, and non-parametric tests.

Learning and Memory
This module will introduce you to the key components and processes of learning and memory. You will consider evidence suggesting that memory can be partitioned into different sub-systems, particularly short- and long-term memory. You will also look at the detailed processes that govern retrieval and forgetting, the nature of autobiographical memory, mnemonic techniques, and memory disorders. You will learn how memory is studied experimentally and how cognitive theories of memory may be developed or challenged based on empirical data.

Self and Society
In this module, you will be introduced to the basics of personality and social psychology. You will look at the key dynamic personality theories of Freud and Jung, and develop an understanding of the theories and research on aggression, pro-social behaviour and conformity. You will also examine fundamental topics in social psychology, attitudes and values, as well as cross-cultural psychology and leadership.

Lifespan Development
In this module, you will be introduced to developmental psychology, which seeks to understand and explain changes in an individual’s physical, cognitive, and social capacities across the lifespan. You will learn about the historical and conceptual issues underlying developmental psychology, and the research methods used for studying individuals at different ages. You will study the major theories of cognitive development in relation to physical development in the prenatal period, cognitive and social development during infancy and changes during childhood, and finally the physical, cognitive, and social changes that occur in adulthood and older age.

Biological Foundations of Psychology
This module will introduce you to the key biological concepts and research techniques relevant to psychology. Topics include the basics of neural function, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and the research methods used.

Sensation and Perception
This module will introduce you to conceptual issues such as sensory perception as a gateway to the world, information processing, the sensory channels that are available to humans, and how we make sense of the world through sensory integration. You will develop an understanding of the attentional modulation of perception, looking at selected topics from visual perception such as deciphering the neural code, illusions as keys to reality, and the perception of brightness, colour, time, motion and depth. You will also examine auditory perception, touch, taste and smell, and the control of eye and head movements as a link between perception and action.

Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
In this module, you will be introduced to the concept of psychological abnormality. You will develop an understanding of how abnormality is defined in psychology and how its definition has developed and changed through history. You will look at different approaches to understanding abnormal psychology, including the biomedical model, social and cultural approaches to abnormality, and psychodynamic, behavioural and cognitive approaches.

Year 2

Psychological Research Methods and Analysis
In this module you will learn about how to use SPSS to analyse, interpret and graph data, one way ANOVA (independent and repeated), factorial ANOVA (independent, repeated and mixed), ANCOVA, complex correlations, linear regression (multiple, categorical predictors, stepwise and hierarchical), logistic regression and factor analysis. You will also study research methods topics including advanced experimental design (factorial and quasi experimental designs), questionnaire design and validation, and qualitative analyses.

Cognitive Psychology
This module will provide you with an overview of the key theoretical and empirical issues in cognitive psychology, including selective attention, multisensory perception and problem solving. You will look at reasoning, judgement and blindsight, and examine the impact of unilateral neglect and attention for action.

Social Psychology
In this module, you will develop an understanding of the key topics in social psychology, with a particular focus on topics that highlight over-arching debates within this area of study. You will look at how social psychology can be applied to real-world issues, examining the social psychology of relationships, the self-concept, prejudice and group conflict, attribution theory, group decision-making, situational perspectives on evil, and non-verbal behaviour and social cognition.

Developmental Psychology
In this module you will develop an understanding of cognitive development, including intelligence across the lifespan, language development, and number representation, and the development of social understanding, including social cognition, emotional development, prejudice, and adolescence. You will look in depth at the research techniques used in developmental psychology, as well as enchancing your ability to conduct critical analyses.

Personality and Individual Differences
In this module you will examine theory and research in key areas of personality and individual differences. You will explore the difference between these two areas of study, and become equipped with methods of evaluating theories of personality. You will review key topics in personality and individual differences, with consideration for the relations between them in order to develop your intergrative understanding of personality.

Brain and Behaviour
In this module you will develop an understanding of why modern psychology requires an understanding of neuroscience. You will look at neuronal structure, function and information transmission, and the organisation of the nervous system and how this reflects the principles of information processing. You will examine the methods used to study structure and information processing in the brain, becoming familiar with the brain’s functional architectures and the neural basis of learning. You will also consider brain evolution, and the biology and psychopharmacology of reward, reinforcement and psychological disorders.

Conceptual Issues in Psychology
This module will provide you with an introdution to the philosophical, conceptual, and historical underpinnings of the ways in which psychology is studied today. You will cover broad conceptual issues such as ‘what is science?’ and how psychology fits in, what makes a good scientific theory, and the philosophies of how sciences develop. You will look at the rise of behaviourism and cognitive psychology, the historical development of cognitive neuroscience and debates regarding the relation between mind and brain, and how psychology became an applied as well as a basic science of mind and behaviour.

Year 3

Research Project
In this module, you will carry out a piece of research as part of a small group, closely supervised by a member of academic staff. You will develop teamwork, presentation and analytical skills, and produce a substantial, independently written, report of your study.

Optional modules

In addition to these mandatory course units there are a number of optional course units available during your degree studies. The following is a selection of optional course units that are likely to be available. Please note that although the College will keep changes to a minimum, new units may be offered or existing units may be withdrawn, for example, in response to a change in staff. Applicants will be informed if any significant changes need to be made.

Career opportunities

Royal Holloway’s Department of Psychology graduates are highly employable, and go on to enjoy rewarding careers in a range of different fields. All of our psychology programmes are recognised by the British Psychological Society as the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership – giving you the option to undertake postgraduate study in Psychology.

Study psychology, clinical and cognitive neuroscience at Royal Holloway and you’ll graduate with a range of desirable transferable skills, including advanced literacy and numeracy skills, critical reading, report writing, interviewing, survey research, observation, experimentation and the ability to use statistical methods to assess research findings. We support students with careers information and advice throughout the duration of their studies, and hold annual ‘Meet Our Grads’ events to help students share the knowledge and experience of our alumni.

The Department of Psychology is dedicated to helping students prepare for their graduate careers. Throughout their studies, students benefit from a programme of careers seminars, events, advice and information. Plus, we have established connections with many local organisations, including the Macular Society, Southern Addictions Advisory Service and Bishop Creighton House, providing you with the chance to enjoy rewarding placement opportunities.

Within six months of graduation, 90% of psychology graduates (Unistats 2015) have gone onto full time employment or further studies. As well as careers directly linked to criminology and psychology, the transferable skills gained will form an excellent basis for potential careers in criminal justice agencies. As such, graduates have found employment with criminal justice agencies such as the Crown Prosecution Service, the police, probation service, youth custody and the prison service. Others have pursued careers in banking, publishing, media, management, local government, mental health support, youth work or other support work. In addition, a large number of students progress to further study at masters or doctoral level.

Apply now! Fall semester 2021/22
This intake is not applicable

Application deadlines apply to citizens of: United States

Apply now! Fall semester 2021/22
This intake is not applicable

Application deadlines apply to citizens of: United States